Java

Your Java Code Is Mostly Fluff, New Research Finds

In a new paper (PDF), researchers from the University of California, Davis, Southeast University in China, and University College London theorized that, just as with natural languages, some — and probably, most — written code isn’t necessary to convey the point of what it does. The code and data used in the study are available for download from Bitbucket. But here’s the bottom line: Only about 5% of written Java code captures the core functionality.

Your Java Code Is Mostly Fluff, New Research Finds was originally published on realcoders.org

Modern Component Design with Spring

Great presentation on SlideShare regarding Modern Component Design with Spring

Modern Component Design with Spring was originally published on realcoders.org

Overview of Dependency Injection in Spring

Just noticed that SlideShare has a nice presentation on Dependency Injection in Spring for anyone new to DI/CDI (specifically using the Spring Framework…)

Overview of Dependency Injection in Spring was originally published on realcoders.org

Java 9 Features Announced — What Do You Think?

A series of Java Enhancement Proposals (JEPs) has been published on OpenJDK concerning the next major update (Java 9). Previous rumors about Java 9 features haven’t had very much weight, nor particularly interesting new features, but this new feature list is packed with developer favorites that the community has been requesting for many years.

These features include:

Check out the original article, posted on DZone by Benjamin Ball!

Java 9 Features Announced — What Do You Think? was originally published on realcoders.org

Free Copy of Graph Databases by O’Reilly

O’reilly’s book, ‘Graph Databases
The Definitive Book on Graph Databases‘, has been made available for free (as a downloadable eBook) through the Neo4J project’s web site!  Go grab your copy while it’s still available!

Free Copy of Graph Databases by O’Reilly was originally published on realcoders.org

Spring Integration: a new addition to the Spring portfolio | SpringSource Team Blog

The following is an exert from Mark Fisher ‘s great introduction to the Spring Integration project:

"Yesterday morning I presented a 2-part session at The Spring Experience entitled "Enterprise Integration Patterns with Spring". The first presentation included an overview of core Spring support for enterprise integration – including JMS, remoting, JMX, scheduling, and email. That presentation also included a high-level discussion of several of the Enterprise Integration Patterns introduced in the book of the same name by Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Woolf. In the second presentation, I officially unveiled "Spring Integration" – a new addition to the Spring portfolio. Spring Integration builds upon Spring’s core support while providing a higher level of abstraction largely inspired by those patterns. Here I would like to provide a brief overview of the topics I discussed in that session."

Link to Mark’s original blog post:
SPRING INTEGRATION: A NEW ADDITION TO THE SPRING PORTFOLIO

Spring Integration: a new addition to the Spring portfolio | SpringSource Team Blog was originally published on realcoders.org

How to build Big Data Pipelines for Hadoop using OSS

SpringOne 2GX Highlight: How to build Big Data Pipelines for Hadoop using OSS (Costin Leau)

How to build Big Data Pipelines for Hadoop using OSS was originally published on realcoders.org

Spring Framework 3.2 M2 Released

SpringSource Community Logo

An announcement from the SpringSource Community came yesterday, and apparently the Spring Framework 3.2 M2 has been released!  As always, it’s currently available from the SpringSource Repository and they even offer a quick tutorial on resolving any dependency issues (artifacts) via Maven that you may have if you’re not familiar with Maven yet (you really should be…)  The complete distribution zip is available as usual from the SpringSource community download site.

Highlights from 3.2 M2 include:

Chris Beams over at SpringSource Community had the following to say regarding both the 3.2 M2 Milestone as well as the upcoming 3.2-RELEASE:

“A major area of focus for 3.2 is ensuring that Spring Framework runs flawlessly on JDK7. M2 artifacts have been built, tested and published against JDK7 and we continue to test JDK6 compatibility in nightly builds as well. We encourage all Spring users on JDK7 to give M2 a spin in your development and test environments and provide as much feedback as possible prior to 3.2 GA. Thanks!

Users of @Configuration classes and Spring’s support for subclass proxies (proxy-target-class=true), please take note: it is now no longer necessary to add CGLIB as an explicit dependency to work with these features. As of 3.2 M2, we have upgraded to the new CGLIB 3.0. We repackage all net.sf.cglib classes to org.springframework.cglib and inline them directly within the spring-core JAR. This means that all @Configuration and subclass proxying functionality works out of the box in M2, and means no potential for CGLIB conflicts with other projects. Likewise, we have upgraded to the new ASM 4.0, which we continue to repackage and inline as we have done for quite some time now. Note however that we’ve eliminated the dedicated spring-asm jar in M2 in favor of including org.springframework.asm classes directly in spring-core. Both of these upgrades are good news for JDK7 users writing Spring components in dynamic JVM languages, as these new versions of CGLIB and ASM properly handle the new invokedynamic bytecode instruction introduced in JDK7.

Enjoy!”

Spring Framework 3.2 M2 Released was originally published on realcoders.org

Java Spotlight Podcast: Part 2

@java on Twitter informs us of the Java Spotlight Podcast: Part 2 by Henrik Ståhl, Senior Product Director, on Java Platform Development.

Java Spotlight Podcast: Part 2 was originally published on realcoders.org