C++

Empirical Study On How C Devs Use Goto In Practice Says “Not Harmful”

Edsger Dijkstra famously opined in 1968 on the danger of GOTO statements. Mei Nagappan writes with a mellower view, nearly 50 years later:

By qualitatively and quantitatively analyzing a statistically valid random sample from almost 2 million C files and 11K+ projects, we find that developers limit themselves to using goto appropriately in most cases, and not in an unrestricted manner like Dijkstra feared, thus suggesting that goto does not appear to be harmful in practice.

(Here’s the preprint (PDF) linked from above abstract.)

Empirical Study On How C Devs Use Goto In Practice Says “Not Harmful” was originally published on realcoders.org

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Stroustrup Reveals What’s New In C++ 0x (C++ 11)

“Bjarne Stroustrup discusses the latest version of C++, which, although not a major overhaul, offers many small upgrades to appeal to different areas of development. From the interview: ‘I like the way move semantics will simplify the way we return large data structures from functions and improve the performance of standard-library types, such as string and vector. People in high-performance areas will appreciate the massive increase in the power of constant expressions (constexpr). Users of the standard library (and some GUI libraries) will probably find lambda expressions the most prominent feature. Everybody will use smaller new features, such as auto (deduce a variables type from its initializer) and the range-for loop, to simplify code.’”

Stroustrup Reveals What’s New In C++ 0x (C++ 11) was originally published on realcoders.org

New Contiki OS Network Regression Test Framework

Contiki, the open source operating system for the Internet of Things, just got a regression test framework ported over from Thingsquare Mist that allows the Contiki developers to test the entire system on 9 platforms, 4 CPU architectures, and 1021 network nodes, for every new commit.


Some have argued that being a framework, it should have been written in C++ rather than C, and that’s is essentially nothing more than a bunch of libraries and APIs…  However, others point to the fact that, since it’s meant to run on microcontrollers (with only kilobytes of RAM), C is still the best choice for it’s smaller compiled footprint, as OO is still more of a luxury when it comes to embedded programming, etc…

Any thoughts?

New Contiki OS Network Regression Test Framework was originally published on realcoders.org